Hunger Therapy – Or?

How to Make Low Calorie Apple Breakfast Cut th...

How to Make Low Calorie Apple Breakfast Cut the Apple (Photo credit: admiller)

What is Hunger Therapy?

You know if it is Hunger Therapy by asking yourself this question:

“If I have eaten my meal (and waited some minutes), or am waiting for my next meal time, or have eaten all my “allowed” food for the day, and I’m still hungry – what am I “supposed” to do?”

If the answer is – - “go hungry”  then what you are doing is a form of Hunger Therapy.

I first published this April 9, 2012. I’m posting it now because it is still topical and because this was originally published as a page “Which Way to Weight Loss?”. As a page it is often not noticed by people in the way a post would be. I’ve made some minor editing to provide context and improve readability.

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What is the most promising strategy to try first for most people seeking to reduce high total or belly body fat:

  • calories are controlled by intent - capped at a prescribed level in spite of hunger

OR

  • calorie are controlled by the appetite/satiety control system - the task is to help the appetite/satiety control system function appropriately so that weight can trend towards normal without sustained hunger?

CONTEXT

No-one has a lock on what the best way forward is. I am bringing up some concerns that I feel warrant some consideration.

Many people have spent their long efforts doing their best to support the health and well-being of people who would like to improve their health by loosing weight. Much effort has gone in to pursuing many different approaches to treatment. Given the striking and unexpected absence of substantial long term benefit other than for small numbers of people, a full re-evaluation is warranted. I am with those many who feel that one vitally important aspect of this is to assess and consider the potential harmful effects of not only the occurrence for individuals of sustained hunger as a side-effect of the recommended restricted-calorie eating, but also the potential harms from the very existence of professional advice that it is advisable and desirable and “good behaviour” to engage in sustained hunger for medical benefit.

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There is a fundamental choice at the core of any eating plan designed for loss of body fat:

  • (1) set a limit on the total daily intake of food energy (calories)
  • (2) do not set a limit on the total daily intake of food energy (calories)

These two options are mutually exclusive.  You can’t have both those choices at the same time.  Either there is a limit set or there is not.  If the limit is “sort-of-set”, there is not actually a limit – as in, “the total calories for the day is to be no more than (for example) 1400 calories  — well, unless you are really, really hungry, then have more to eat if you want”.

This choice could be expressed another way:

  • Option 1: stay below a set limit of total calories for the day, whether you become hungry or not. Calories are capped, and this is the path to success, with hunger being a nuisance side-effect to be ignored or managed.  Weight/fat mass is tracked over time and the calorie cap is adjusted up or down until a calorie level is found that permits weight loss at the desired pace.

or,

  • Option 2: calorie balance is monitored indirectly by following any changes in body weight/fat mass over time. Sustained or excess hunger is regarded as a threat to long-term success and is to be avoided. The path to success is through taking steps to achieve the absence of excess hunger (adequate level of satiety) while eating an amount of calories that permits slow weight loss.

In the first situation, excess hunger is regarded as not of direct importance to the outcome.  In the second situation, excess hunger is considered to directly interfere with long-term successful outcome.

The Theory – In the calorie restriction model, the idea is that as long as the individually-adjusted calorie cap is not exceeded, then loss of body fat will proceed. The idea is that hunger will not itself prevent this loss of body fat, it is just an unpleasant nuisance. It is agreed that hunger can indirectly prevent success, if the person responds to the hunger by eating more than the set limit of food. Hunger can also indirectly interfere with the effectiveness of this approach by leading the person to abandon the treatment plan and/or by discouraging future attempts to follow similar treatment plans. Note that this set of ideas must be based on an assumption that it is safe and smart to ignore and disrupt your body’s basic maintenance and survival signalling system.

Because excess hunger can lead to the person “breaking their diet”, a growing amount of medical attention and research is being paid to the science of hunger/appetite/satiety. It is also understood that the study of hunger/satiety will shed light on the factors that are promoting the current obesity crisis.

For the past many decades, overwhelmingly the common (OK, the standard of care) approach to body fat loss has been to advise or prescribe a set limit on total daily food energy (calorie) intake. This limit may be expressed as a calorie number (for example, 1500 calories per day) or as serving amounts of various foods, which is just a less obvious way of counting calories.

How do you recognize a calorie-restricted approach? Curiously, by the same criteria I have outlined at the top of this page regarding Hunger Therapy.

The mathematics of the approach is so convincing, and it all appears so logical, that it has pretty much been taken as a given that:

  • the benefits were plainly obvious
  • the risk of harm was plainly low
  • the balance of benefit to harm was plainly so great as to not require specific investigation

So, why this long article?  What is the point of this discussion?

There is a shaking, dust and confusion at the very foundation of what has been the standard approach to weight loss. Each of the above three points has come under serious doubt:

  • the long-term effectiveness of limited-calorie dieting seems to be amazingly less than anticipated
  • the long-term safety of limited-calorie dieting has increasingly come under doubt
  • the net benefit versus harm is in doubt and has not been proven scientifically

To be clear, these statements are not limited to limited-calorie dieting, but are true for weight loss diets in general. However, I would contend that the attitude favouring calorie restriction is so pervasive in the culture that any research on over-weight/obesity is going to be studying calorie-restricted eating unless a very concerted effort is expressly made to avoid the ingrained behaviours of calorie restriction in the study population. Therefore, are we actually totally sure what we have in the way of weight-loss/control studies (on obese people, otherwise they don’t count anyway) that are completely free from the contaminating effect of calorie-restricting behaviours. In other words, have pretty much all research studies in the past decades been, in actuality, studies that at least reflect, in some part, the effects of self-imposed and possibly even automatic calorie-restriction (even when that has not been intended or there has even been an attempt to avoid it)?

Under these circumstances, perhaps it would be useful to revisit the core decision as to whether to impose a calorie limit or not.  Or, more to the point, the choice whether to use a diet approach where excess hunger is a nuisance to be tolerated, or a diet approach where excess hunger is considered a threat to success and is to be avoided (and excess hunger is primarily considered as a symptom of something more needed to be understood or changed for that person).

One might term the first choice “Hunger Therapy”. As tempting as that is, that delicious term would be misleading as there is actually no intent to cause hunger, hunger just happens to be the standard outcome. On the other hand, I suspect it is a term that many people who have been through multiple cycles of limited-calorie diets would instantly relate to. There is some merit, though, to the use of a term like “Hunger-Inducing-Treatment”.  This would yield the acronym “HIT”.

This might seem like just having some fun with words. It might also seem like an attempt to be nasty or to pick a fight and throw names at people who have been doing their best to provide the best care they know to people who have a real medical need to reduce their body fat. Neither is true. No-one can lay claim to knowledge of a medical treatment for reduction of excess body fat that is scientifically proven in a large population of people to be both safe and effective in the long, long term – none exist.

For all these reasons, the conversation must be opened up. Things that have been taken for granted, assumptions that have been made, things that “every-one knows are true” all have to be brought out and looked at from the ground up. I think that naming hunger as an under-considered harm is one aspect of the broad re-considering that must be done.

Hunger? What of that?  Aren’t we supposed to ignore the hunger and “stick to the diet plan”.  Isn’t that the advice that pervades society, from agencies and health practitioners alike, repeated over decades?  Isn’t the hunger little more than a nuisance, to be ignored or managed as best as possible? Conquered, even? A test of one’s character?

There is the outcome on the individual directly of the attempt to endure sustained hunger (and of “failing” to do so). There is a whole extra set of problems when the professional/agency advice to put up with sustained hunger becomes incorporated into a general societal attitude that expands and gets passed down over generations.

There are rumblings (angry screaming?) that the persistent, excess hunger (and the other outcome of this professional/societal attitude that hunger can be safely ignored and, in fact, you are displaying approved behaviour if you do) is an unsuspected, slow-onset, toxic bomb that goes off in the individual and in society over the course of months, years, decades.

There are many people who have made this point long before me.

If “Hunger-Inducing-Treatment” is in doubt as a promising way forward, perhaps it is time to give the alternate approach (option 2 above) at least a good try.

Perhaps a useful term would be “Satiety-Focused Weight Health”.

To be continued …

Related articles:

  • They Starved, We Forgot  LINK to post on Ancestral Weight Loss Registry
  • Nov 21/12 LINK to new post by Gary Taubes, “What would happen if…? Thoughts (and thought experiments) on the calorie issue.”

8 thoughts on “Hunger Therapy – Or?

  1. Decades ago, I realized that going hungry just does not work for me. I also observed that it doesn’t appear to work for most people. It’s like a dripping faucet, or the so-called “water drip torture.” You can ignore hunger for a while. But it never lets up, and eventually you will cave. I believe that most people have only a finite amount of “willpower.”

    That observation came from my failure at several diets. The most spectacular failure was with the Ornish-style diet, where I low-fat-dieted my way somewhere north of 350 lbs. When my wife suggested that we go on a low-carb diet, I went along (as the supportive husband) even though I *knew* that it wouldn’t work in the long run, simply because diets always make you hungry all the damned time.

    13 years later, and 120 lbs lighter (yes, I’m still overweight, but it’s better than being 370 lbs), I’m happy to say that low-carb does not cause excessive, gnawing, persistent hunger.

    • Thanks for your concise yet detailed observations, Howard – a great example of what many people report. The hunger is the crux of the matter and is incomprehensibly absent from mainstream discussions. Deal with the hunger and you have a solution. I could have called my blog “it’s the hunger, stupid” – but I decided I didn’t want to focus on the “hunger” word, but on something more positive – satiety. I also, though tempted, felt it better not to put something like “duh” in the title. I was so struck, when re-reading Atkins’ 1972 book, how he includes in his story just how much of a problem he felt he had with hunger and how releaved he was to find his solution.

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  3. I love this, thank you for posting it as a blog post so that we would all notice it. :)

    I do feel that hunger is the obstacle between me and achieving a more healthy body composition. Every time I try “Hunger Therapy” (even when low-carb or ketogenic), and inevitably fail, it takes months or longer to get my hunger signaling back to a livable state. The only path to success for me is to learn what keeps me satisfied and I am still searching for that answer!

    • Well put, Daytona. We really don’t have all the tools we need yet. Thankfully, now at least we have the web, so we can learn more from each other. I know you are one of those commited to sharing what you experience. On My Keto Haven, I have a link to Ellen’s story – which is particularly interesting because she has made a calorie target work for her, after (I think part of the key is the “after” part) getting the most she could from low carb and lifestyle. I’m not sure that I could pull that off, myself. I’ve been thinking about setting up another story list – the “shrinking by microns” group :-) .
      Thanks for your comment, Dea

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