Weight Health, Satiety and Carb Control – A Framework

I have added somewhat to my page previously called “About” and now called “Overview”.  Because this is meant to communicate the heart and soul of what the blog is about and why it exits, I post here the page content in full:

                        “over the past decade, everything has changed…. “

This is a blog dedicated to weight health and to the discussion of satiety as the guiding light and principal most likely to result in success for most individuals.

“Satiety”  (sa-TY-i-tee)  – as I will use it here, is the sense of having satisfied one’s appetite for food; one’s appetite has been satisfied by the food consumed.

“Weight Health” – refers to the fact that there is a lot more involved in a person’s health and well-being than simply how much body fat they may be carrying. The amount of body fat must not be such a dominant concern that other aspects of health and well-being are neglected, discounted or put in jeopardy.  A better term would be “body composition health” since it is now understood that many of the people who are slim or have a  body weight in the “normal” range are suffering harm from relatively small amounts of body fat, but tucked hidden within their bellies.

Why bother?

Because over the past decade everything has changed. Excitement and hope are the realistic, practical outcome.

We used to think we knew what we were doing when it came to weight (fat) loss.  If only people could be disciplined and follow the medical advice, all would be solved.  Just eat less and move more.  Go hungry, if need be. Even if you get very hungry, tough it out and above all “don’t break your diet”.  “Diet” always referred to a limit on the total calories consumed in a day. (The limit being a calorie number given or being a set limit on total food servings, which is just a less obvious way of setting a calorie limit.)

There is a growing chorus of voices suggesting/demanding a total re-thinking of the approach to weight control, from the basic concepts on up.

Why?

Calorie-restricted dieting has not saved us.  For the population as a whole, the message has not stopped a growing crisis of obesity.  For people who are individually prescribed such diets as part of their medical care, the long-term results are stunningly disappointing.  This reality is now just so obvious to everyone that it cannot be ignored or brushed aside any longer.  Yes, some people do well and we need to learn from them, but over-all we are getting further behind.

Calorie-restricted dieting may have unexpectedly and quietly caused long-term harm. There is a growing movement of rejection of calorie-restricted dieting for various reasons, suggesting that this practice might increase the risk of dis-ordered eating patterns, eating disorders, food addiction, depression, lowered metabolism, etc.  There is an urgent need for research to answer these concerns.

The past decade has brought us new information and understandings that profoundly change our options and demand a re-working of our concepts.

Such as:

Obesity itself is not a major cause of death or illness.  The amount of body fat is generally not the major factor in obesity-associated death and illness, other than at very high levels of body fat. Some people can be quite obese and not have much health impact (excluding effects related to physical size, such as stress on joints.)  The type of medical harms that we usually associate with obesity can show up also in those who are in the normal body weight category, but are “metabolically obese”.

Metabolic syndrome (basically intolerance of carbohydrates, with insulin resistance and a gradual worsening of blood sugar control) and inflammation are the major “toxic factors” in both obesity and those who are normal weight but with deep belly fat. The increase in health problems that show up in studies on obese people are mostly from metabolic syndrome and inflammation – such as increased hypertension, diabetes, heart attack and stroke (among other impacts).  Diabetes then brings its own set of consequences such as kidney disease, eye disease, nerve damage and even further increase in risk for heart attack and stroke.  Researchers also feel that the inflammation and the carbohydrate intolerance increase the risk for cognitive dysfunction, dementia and cancer.  Most, but not all, people, who struggle with their weight have metabolic syndrome (or show evidence of being headed that way).  Most, but not all, people who have normal body weight do not (or not yet) have metabolic syndrome.

The signs of metabolic syndrome can be improved and often reliably and effectively treated by the use of an individually-adjusted carbohydrate-limiting food plan.  Also, and critically, most of the benefit of this treatment can be achieved with or without weight loss even close to “normal” range. “Carbohydrates” is the term used for any and all of the sugars and starches in foods.  There is carbohydrate intolerance, so lower the intake of total carbohydrates and change the foods eaten to lower the surge of glucose absorbed after a meal. For best benefit, also take other measures to improve carbohydrate tolerance, such as exercise.  When carefully applied and adjusted for the individual over time, experienced clinicians find that, almost universally, there is substantial improvement in blood pressure, blood fats and blood sugars and/or insulin levels (among other improvements).  (There is consistent clinical experience and some research showing this, more research would help.)

With effective relief from the burden of metabolic syndrome, with its accompanying elevated insulin levels, there is almost always a substantial reduction in excess body fat stores.  This is likely related mostly to reductions from previously elevated insulin levels.  When insulin levels are high, the body’s metabolic machinery favours turning the carbohydrate you eat into fat and storing it. High insulin levels also strongly resist the release of fat from stores to allow burning it off.

Relief from the damaging effects of metabolic syndrome/insulin resistance are much more important medically than whether there is substantial reduction in body weight. Studies into what is “the best” eating plan to achieve weight loss are off the mark on two counts (1) there will never be a best plan, it will depend on the individual metabolism and circumstances and goals and (2) it is vastly more important to find what are the best set of eating plans that, individually, allow the most protection from the harms associated with obesity, principally from metabolic syndrome and inflammation.

Control of body weight involves countless factors and very complex body systems, so no one intervention will ever be all that is needed.  Carbohydrate reduction/restriction is of major importance and benefit for those who have carbohydrate intolerance, but not all people who have high body fat have carbohydrate intolerance.  Unfortunately, low carb eating is not enough in itself to result in normal weight in all circumstances.  It is not magic.  Being on a low carb eating plan does not mean that you are living in a bubble, not affected by all the other factors that affect weight control such as high calories, poor sleep, food addictions, medications that promote weight gain, etc, etc.

If you have metabolic syndrome or a tendency to it, low carb eating can greatly improve your health and greatly improve your weight control while you work on finding the other things you need to do to further improve your weight control.

Nutritional ketosis is a powerful medical tool and can play an important role separate from any carbohydrate intolerance and separate from weight loss.

Low carb eating is actually four medical interventions confused together:

  • (1) as a means to protect the body from the various harmful effects of  carbohydrate intolerance/insulin resistance (metabolic syndrome), including lowering  blood insulin levels to allow a tipping of the balance from fat storage to fat release for burning and
  • (2) as a means to maintain abstinence for people who find that they have an addiction-like response to sweet or starchy foods or to fatty foods that are sweet or starchy (they can learn that they do not need to eat any sweet or starchy foods)
  • (3) as a means to improve the ability to maintain a stable blood sugar within the healthy range by dietary means with or without the help of medications (in the least dosages, thereby lessening medication adverse effects)
  • (4) as a means to be in the metabolic state known as “nutritional ketosis“.  Without going into the details here, nutritional ketosis is a normal physiological state that is part of your basic ancient metabolic flexibility.  In this state, you are burning fats and a fat-derived substance called “ketones” for almost all of your body needs.  In this state you need and burn a very small amount of glucose.  This small amount of glucose is critically needed, but your body can make it from protein and you don’t really need any from your food (if your body is working normally – this is not true in certain disease states and with certain medications, such as insulin and others that lower blood glucose).

Are there more than these four types of basic elements of the effects of carb control or low carb eating on health?  There is a lot of discussion on this topic, but its too early for conclusions.

By understanding the needs of each unique person in regards to what aspects of carbohydrate control are most important for them, a fully individualised eating plan can be worked out that allows the greatest flexibility and freedom, with the least amount of restriction that achieves their goals and is consistent with their circumstances and informed choices.

Nutritional ketosis is a medical intervention which helps control appetite – independent of whether the person is insulin resistance or not.

Because nutritional ketosis is a tool in itself, it can be targeted more specifically as a goal if the benefits are considered worthwhile in any given person’s situation.  This may involve avoiding high intake of protein, use of MCT oil (a coconut oil derivative that readily converts to ketones in the liver), use of metformin to reduce abnormally excessive production of glucose by the liver, and other strategies. (MCT oil is stripped of all other nutrients and could only be used sparingly and thoughtfully as a medical intervention.)

Research and clinical experience over decades have improved the understanding of fully individualised carb-controlled eating as a long-term, essentially permanent lifestyle option, so the medical benefits are available in a sustained way (essentially acting like a long-term medication).

Food addiction-like responses, food triggering and brain sensitization have received increasing attention and come to be understood as key factors in weight control.  For people who have addiction responses to foods containing sugars and/or starches, the understanding that full abstinence is an option (there is no health requirement for intake of carbohydrates and they can be avoided except for those consumed daily in salads and non-starchy vegetables) can change their lives.

There is also improved understanding of dis-ordered eating patterns and the eating disorders.

This blog is my contribution towards putting into words the facts, concepts and options at play.

This blog is full of hope and enthusiasm that current new understandings and information, along with the networked communication of informed and determined people, can bring the needed tools into the grasp of many (possibly even most) people even with what we know and can share right now.

Let none be left behind – if you have a particularly difficult time achieving weight loss to your best healthy weight, then we all have something to learn from your journey.  I have had a personal life lesson in never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never give up and I encourage you (though some days you may need to pause from the striving) to put one try ahead of another. Given the massive research effort and the opportunity the internet gives us to put our heads together, hope is actually a very realistic attitude.

CONTEXT

My viewpoint is that all the researchers, clinicians, academics, policy makers and commentators are motivated from a true and honest heart.  Each one is striving for the goal of the best health and best fulfillment of life for individuals and for society as a whole.  Because there will not ever be one right best answer for weight health, and because not one of us knows yet the full collection of interventions/treatments that will bring access to weight health to all people, there are many different opinions.  Passionate discussion and rebuttal is the result.  But, “we fight because we care”.  Individuals who just want to collect their pay and go home would not waste time and energy on vigorous debate.  The more the crisis grows, the more testy the interactions can get.  We are all striving for the same goal.

This blog is written mostly from the point of view of the usefulness af low-carbohydrate nutrition  – as ONE OF the useful interventions to consider. There are countless factors that act together in determining an individual’s body weight at any particular time.  The vast majority of people who struggle with their weight will need to make use of a number of different interventions/treatments/lifestyle changes in their lives to achieve and maintain their desired healthy body composition.  Low-carb eating is not the sole intervention needed, nor is it important for all.

I’m not advocating for low-carb eating for all, I am advocating for the best health and fulfilling life for all, by whatever means prove to be best.  The proper stance of any physician, researcher, etc., is “let the truth win out”.  I write about low-carb nutrition because I think it is critically important that this option be more widely known and better understood.  There is a tremendous amount of confusion and mis-information about low-carb nutrition. This is hindering people from achieving what could be life-changing benefits.  What I am advocating, also, is that each person be aware that carbohydrate intolerance could be a factor in their health and that they receive knowledgable help, now and over the stages of their lives, in evaluating this impact and what it means for their health and for their food choices.

What I would like to see is carbohydrate awareness and carbohydrate literacy.

Each person’s body weight and composition is their own business. I would like to make a contribution towards improving the degree to which it is also their own free choice.

Short Link for this post http://wp.me/p2jTRh-9f

Review: Diet 101 by Jenny Ruhl

Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets (Kindle Edition)
This book is a natural continuation on from the author’s on-line interactions and blogging that led to her remarkable contribution Blood Sugar 101. There has been a perception that the main value of choosing to change the amount or type of carbohydrates (sugars and starches) in your diet is as a weight loss diet. Also, there has been a perception that this strategy is only valuable if applied very strictly – and this strict application then means that many people find it too difficult to keep up over time.

In Diet 101, Jenny Ruhl emphasises the fact that the greatest value from controlling carbs is in keeping blood sugars within the normal, non-damaging range. What if you’re not diabetic? Many people who do not meet the cut-off blood sugar test levels to be diagnosed with diabetes have blood sugar levels, at least for parts of the day, that are associated with slowly-accumulating harm to health. This problem is very widespread in our society.

What to do? This damage can be avoided, or at least lessened, by changing your intake of carbohydrate foods – by just as much as you need to and/or are able to. Even changes less than targeting perfection can bring benefits you might really value.

Jenny Ruhl explains all this in her new book in a clear, easy to understand manner, with all the back-up science also available for those who are interested. Also, she ties the excess swings in blood sugar to excess hunger drive and the tendency to gain weight. To be useful, this needs to be practical day-to-day, which is an important goal and strength of the book.

My review on Amazon of Jenny Ruhl’s new book.

Update: Please see my blog “Carpe Your Blood Sugar” inspired by the work of Jenny Ruhl and Dr. Richard K. Bernstein.  Links on the Resources page there to 3 interviews with Jenny.  www.carpeyourbloodsugar.com

(This post short link http://wp.me/p2jTRh-6F).

Telling People They Don’t Exist

One of my pet peeves is when people are, in effect, told that they don’t exist.

An example?  I get a migraine and flu-like symptoms if I eat even a tiny amount of gluten.  I don’t have celiac disease, I have gluten sensitivity. This has a major impact on the day-to-day living of my life and is something I can never afford to forget, ignore or down-play any time I am around food. Yet, to the vast majority of my own medical colleagues I don’t exist. They recognize the existence of a person occupying the space my body is in. However, what they see there is a person who isn’t me as I know myself to be. They see some deluded or self-deluded not very competent person who holds a questionable and likely false belief that places them in the ranks of the crackpots who think they are harmed by wheat, in the absence of laboratory proof. The recent recognition of gluten sensitivity as a medical condition (see this post) has not received wide-spread attention and is likely to be slow to be incorporated into routine medical practice.

People who have gained substantial health benefits from following a low-carb lifestyle are often treated in the same way. Many people report how frustrated they have felt when their doctors, their friends or work colleagues, or family members have discounted their stories and/or, even worse, discounted them as individuals for the decisions they have made and the “obviously false” conclusions they have come to.

But consider, does it ever happen the other way?

A few months ago I had an experience that has stayed in the back of my mind since.  On one of the blogs about low carb nutrition, I was reading an older post and the looong list of 50 or more comments under it. There was a lot of back-and-forth commenting among the contributors and with the author.  There was a good spirit of comradery evident. Everybody who raised a question, interesting idea or dilemma was responded to  — that is, everyone except one soul. One person posted a comment asking for insight or helpful comment on her situation – asking, that is, for help.  This soul was ignored as if she had leprosy. Her comment fell into a black pit.  The others resumed their conversations as if she didn’t exist.

Her social crime for which she received shunning – she dared to report that she was having little progress with weight loss despite a persistent and apparently well-applied very low carb/ketogenic diet. The post was old and the comments section had been closed, so I couldn’t respond to her myself.

It is easy to love the idea that going low-carb is a sure-fire ticket to weight loss heaven.  This idea makes people smile and feel confident and enthusiastic.

The up-side  — the enthusiasm helps the knowledge spread.

The down-side  — since there is and never will be a sure-fire ticket to weight loss heaven, some individuals can feel unrecognized and discounted. Also, people who are broadly knowledgable about weight control issues recognize this as a false concept and this contributes to lack of respect for the message that low-carb nutrition is a valuable medical intervention (thus limiting the spread of the knowledge).

Low-carb nutrition and nutritional ketosis are very powerful and broadly beneficial tools that can help with weight loss in many ways. There are people who need other tools in addition or instead. Also, the benefits of low-carb nutrition can be swamped or over-ridden by other factors  – for example, certain medications or high stress states.

Many people do spectacularly well when adopting low-carb nutrition as a means to weight loss. Many others do very well or at least do well.  Messaging that focuses on dramatic weight loss, though, can mean that people miss the knowledge of how low-carb nutrition may benefit their health even in the absence of substantial weight loss.  It can mean that people get discouraged and miss out on the many other potential benefits.

“The reasonable man adapts himself to the world.  The unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.  Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”  – George Bernard Shaw

If you have benefited from low-carb nutrition, or someone you love has, you might owe a debt to someone somewhere in the past who was not able to achieve success with weight loss with the use of the knowledge and advice they then had access to. The knowledge and understanding of low-carb nutrition is only available to us today because of the determined efforts of one individual after another, acting in response to this lack of success.

If you have a story of fabulous, easy success to tell  – please share it, share it!  Be proud, strut, jump up and down.

I would like to encourage the practice of avoiding suggesting that because it was easy  – or even just that it was possible – for you, that this means it would be or should be the same for all others.

That “unreasonable person” whose response isn’t the same as others’ is a person we can all learn from.  Their situation may be just about to spur some new understanding that will benefit us all some day.

Addendum:  I realize that I might have left that sounding as if there was only one incident that concerned me. Unfortunately, I have more than once read posted comments that flat out stated that since that person had achieved a great outcome with controlled carb intake, that this meant all was solved for everyone else if they would only just get with the program – again meaning that anyone still visibly overweight could be judged on the spot as someone who just wasn’t trying hard enough. I guess being addicted to feeling superior is something that doesn’t show at the waist band.