Let’s just say it about hunger – 2

  • focus on hunger/satiety rather than some judgement about what should be the “normal” way to eat
  • the confusion of what is “usual” (a simple fact) with what is “normal” (a judgement)
  • carbohydrate load strain is simply about being metabolically non-alike
  • Metabolic diversity – laying claim to acknowledgement and respect

Continued from previous post …

Of course, I just had to post a comment to her, and her reply also deserves attention:

“Well, Dea, we could start by refusing to use the dominant discourse which insists we name the kind of eating (which I do) that provides satiety and eliminates hunger as “low carb” or “high fat”. Those are simply socially constructed categories that force people to think of eating for satiety as some WEIRD or anti-social or (OMG) UNHEALTHY way to eat. It’s “low” or “high” because the so-called authorities (corrupted by corporate influences, etc) SAY IT IS LOW OR HIGH. Crazy making, pure and simple. I’m done playing that stupid game of pretense–my lived experiences inform my choices now, not some “authorities” who don’t give an instant’s thought to my well being. They can’t. They can only spout whatever the “authorities” spout. There’s no relationship to whether it’s helpful for people or not. ARGH.”

This is exactly the kind of direction I’ve been trying to express in much of my writing on this blog, especially the recent 3 post series on Satiety Focused Weight Health. In fact, that is the reason for developing this blog in the first place. Hence the blog title “it’s the satiety” – that is, my view that a key missing ingredient to unlocking the weight control conundrum is to use a focus on satiety as both the essential process and a goal.

I have put my heart and soul into promoting a shift from focusing on “which diet” to focusing on the process of resolving struggles with hunger – which can only be done on an individual-by-individual basis using a trial and error approach to finding what they experience as worthwhile. The target – “weight heath with food peace”.  An individual “lived experience” exploration of hunger/satiety responses to carbohydrates in different amounts and forms is one of the key things to consider within that framework.

Still, we need some language to use when discussing this process of coming to understand one’s own responses to carbs. Whether you wind up eating “low” amounts of carbs or “high” amounts of carbs is not at all the point. The point is, are you having a carbohydrate load that is within your current ability to handle without strain or damage. Are you under carbohydrate load strain or not?

I also have to mention here that some people have clearly reported the “lived experience” that they can feel unwell when consuming carbs at (how shall we call it, we still need to use commonly understood terms to communicate) a “low” intake at various levels below about 100 grams per day.

If neither of these states apply to you, the amount of carbs you are having is just fine for you – and “high” or “low” become not judgement issues, but just matter in terms of practical issues, like finding recipes and exchanging practical ideas with each other.

There is a subtle difference between using “low” or “high” as relative terms that relate to some implied normal and using “low” or “high” as merely descriptive quantitative terms that relate to some factual usual.  “Usual” does not have to include any judgement value of desirable or “normal”. I am short, in that my height is factually below the usual height for women in my country. It is not customary in our society to regard “usual” height as implying a “normal” height, which would make me a deviant. Much confusion arises from mixing up what is “usual” with what is “normal”.

“Metabolic diversity” is the name of the game. I insist that my metabolic individuality be acknowledged and respected. I eat the amount of carbs that is “just right” for me. It is “low” compared to the usual intake. On the other hand, it is not “low” at all compared to any normal level, because there is no “normal carbohydrate intake” to be deviant from.

Related articles

First, solve the hunger.

Stepping Stones

Stepping Stones (Photo credit: Rich Jacques)

Satiety-Focused Weight Health

A walk through …

This is not specific advice to be used without consultation with your personal doctor. This is presented for the purposes of discussion.

This is “the middle part”, which belongs within a larger context of each person’s unique health and medical situation, their resources and circumstances, and their goals, preferences and values.

For example, if you have any problems involving foods, such as digestive issues, gallbladder problems, food allergies, celiac disease, etc., these must be taken into consideration. Be aware that sometimes these only become newly apparent when eating patterns change. If you have, or suspect you may have, an eating disorder or food addiction, please seek personal knowledgable professional care.

The short version -

It’s all about:

  • finding what things may be pushing up your appetite
  • finding what things you can do to get the most satiety (fullness, sense of satisfaction of appetite) from the food you eat
  • during this learning time, understanding that eating to appetite (without over-eating) and having regular meals is fundamental to the process.

First, solve the hunger. Then, consider the weight goals.

For many people, it would go something like this:

  1. Be hopeful – the landscape of weight care has changed dramatically and will change more. Further, substantial health gains often do not require substantial weight loss. “Food peace” is a worthwhile goal in itself.
  2. Help, support and de-burden  - Help from your doctor plays a vital role before and during. Support from people who have made the same changes can make all the difference. Realize that change is work. Find ways to lessen other demands and burdens. Get help with understanding your physical and emotional responses.
  3. Cultivate satiety - the core strategy is to evaluate every aspect of your lifestyle, your health, and your circumstances for all means available to favor satiety and to lessen the things that promote a higher hunger drive. Keep looking, adjusting and learning over time. Nothing replaces this. There are countless factors that affect your appetite/satiety balance. Some are easier to do something about than others.
  4. The three critical “leverage points” that are most useful for most people are – stopping trying to go hungry as a means to weight control, avoiding high insulin levels and blood sugar swings by adjusting your intake of carbohydrates, and learning to recognise and avoid trigger foods. These can be make-or-break keys.
  5. Stop disrupting your appetite/satiety control system. Treating it as a war is not productive. It is now clearly established that using willpower to override the signals from this complex system (going hungry on calorie restricted diets) is not of substantial lasting benefit to most people. This leaves us with the only other option – finding ways to influence and work with the appetite/satiety control system.
  6. Consider the roles of sugar/carbohydrate craving, swings in blood sugar and high insulin levels - From the start, find out whether you are among the approximately two-thirds of the population who have a tendency towards metabolic syndrome – which is expressed as some degree of limitation in how much carbohydrates their body can handle without harm or metabolic strain. Planning your eating style starts with considering your metabolic responses.
  7. Notice the things that interfere with implementing your plans – such as time stress, emotional responses, lack of support, depression, fatigue, pain, insomnia, and many other possible extra burdens or interfering factors. As much as you can, address these. You may need help (e.g. doctor, counsellor, support group). Sometimes a change brings out symptoms of some other health problem.
  8. You may need an extra intervention. Recognize that not everybody can get to the point where their appetite/satiety control system is working in a way that allows them to reach their weight control targets  After implementing satiety-friendly strategies as much as possible, you may need to consider a “second level” intervention. Nutritional ketosis is under-recognized as a useful option to lessen hunger during weight loss. Some people benefit from making use of a soft calorie target. Although not of net benefit for most overweight people, some people prefer a calorie-restricted diet or a meal-replacement medical program and do well with it long term. A “third level” of possible interventions would be obesity management medications and obesity management surgery.
  9. Every one is different. Theories and research will only take you so far – trial and error plays an essential role. Remember that some aspects of how you respond to any given change/intervention will not be obvious. Work with your doctor. Do follow-up lab tests when indicated. Don’t take your response for granted – test, don’t guess, how your blood sugar and lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides) are doing. Once you have as much information as possible, only you can decide what you find worthwhile.

Expanding on this …

1/9  Be hopeful – Using today’s insights, you may have a much easier time with weight loss and weight control than you imagine. Still, we don’t have as many insights and tools as we need, so some people still find it difficult to lose much weight. Even without substantial weight loss, you still likely can greatly improve your sense of well-being, your enjoyment of your life and your health. By maintaining your health (including not sacrificing your health or your enjoyment of life for your weight goal) as much as possible, you will be in a better position to benefit from new developments as they come along. By exploring ways to lessen appetite drive and promote satiety, you may find relief from cravings, struggles with hunger and battles with weight control - this can be very worthwhile even without a return to target weight.

2/9  Help, support and de-burden - See your doctor to gain more insight into your health situation and to consider different options from the viewpoint of your unique situation. Some changes you might want to make may bring up the need for various lab tests before or during the initial stages. You may need review of any medications. You may need to make plans for close follow-up and rapid adjustment of medications if you are undertaking substantial changes to your food intake – especially if you plan to reduce your intake of carbohydrate foods (sugars and starches).

If you make major changes to your eating pattern, you will need some input from your doctor to help you fully assess how that has worked out for you. Some people have unusual and unexpected responses to health choices that may be wonderful choices for many other people. Don’t take your own unique response for granted – be sure to get follow-up evaluations or lab testing done as needed.

3/9  Cultivate satiety - Evaluate every aspect of your health, lifestyle and circumstances for all means available to favour improved functioning of your appetite/satiety control system. It is a big mistake to focus only on diet and activity. For example, one of the biggest barriers is that most people are far more willing to make changes to their food choices than they are to face their need for sleep. You may need to work closely with your doctor to find your way, as pain, insomnia, depression, fatigue, certain medications and many other medical factors may influence your appetite balance.

As you make changes to address the above goals as much as possible, monitor your response by paying attention to how much you feel a need to eat and how your body composition is responding. If you find over time that the amount of food you need to eat to avoid being hungry is not allowing you to reach your weight health goals, re-evaluate whether you are doing all that you reasonably can to support the function of your appetite/satiety control system. Remember to think about sleep, stress and whether your eating and sleeping patterns are consistent day by day - your body functions best on a regular circadian rhythm.

There are countless things that can affect appetite balance and you can expect more research findings to come. Of the things you identify that are, or may be, disrupting your appetite balance, some may be difficult to change and some may be things you can’t change at all. That places more importance on the things that you are able to change.

4/9  There are three critical “leverage points” that can have a make-it-or-break-it impact:

  1. calorie restrictive dieting and all related behaviours
  2. your metabolic response to sugar and starch intake
  3. food cravings and food addiction

5/9  Stop disrupting - Stop messing with your body’s weight control system – stop restricting calories, skipping or delaying meals, going hungry, dis-ordered eating and using stimulants such as stress and caffeine to delay meals. If any of these strategies were useful, we would not be in the situation we are now. As a general strategy, losing weight by going hungry has failed miserably and has probably caused a lot of harm along the way. Stop being at war with your appetite system and learn to work with it.

Learn to honestly recognize restrict/rebound eating patterns as the dead-ends that they are. The most common restrict/rebound eating pattern is skipping or restricting food intake in the early day, followed by over-compensation in the later day. The same pattern may be played out as restriction on week-days followed by overcompensation (rebound of appetite drive) on week-ends.  It also show up as weeks/months of strict calorie restriction followed by over-compensation due to an appetite on over-drive. I think that this restrict/rebound pattern is a major contributor to the current obesity epidemic. The things that indicate when a pattern like this is dysfunctional include – cravings and unwanted over focus on food, intake of food in types and amounts that are unintended and regretted, and over-compensation in the calories consumed in the appetite rebound phase.

Many people find that cravings and later-day over-eating fade away when they learn to eat in ways that promote stable blood sugar, avoid high insulin levels and avoid triggering stress hormones. Of course, eating disorders and addictions are complex disorders that require much more than a simplistic approach. If you have active addictions and eating disorders, your appetite/satiety control system will not have a chance to work properly. If you find that you are having great difficulty controlling your intake of sweets or starchy foods, it is important to know that full abstinence from these is a strategy that many people have chosen. Such an eating pattern can be healthy, enjoyable and very effective for relief from cravings and disruptive eating. An eating plan can be high or low volume according to need.

You can’t learn how to work on friendly terms with your body weight control system while at the same time poking it with a stick. Many people who have had long term struggles with their weight have not gone a day in decades without an appetite/satiety system that is chronically disrupted due to chronic or cyclic calorie restriction or meal skipping/skimping.

6/9  Consider the roles of sugar/carbohydrate craving, swings in blood sugar and high insulin levels - From the start, find out whether your metabolism is able to handle high carbohydrate meals without straining to cope. That is, whether the amount and/or rate of glucose coming into you body after eating a high carbohydrate meal is handled well by your body in your current state of health. Is your appetite being driven by swings in blood sugar?  This often shows as hunger a few hours after having a meal that would have seemed substantial enough to last until the next meal time.

Are you showing signs of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance? Is your fasting blood glucose above normal?  Does your blood glucose go up above normal after meals? Do you have type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes?  High insulin levels that occur from insulin resistance promote fat storage.  A tendency to gain weight around the middle is one of the hallmarks of metabolic syndrome.

All of these things affect the appetite/satiety control system.  Any of these effects can be so strong that weight control can, in some people, be very difficult without addressing them. If any of these conditions apply to you, you will likely find it much easier to improve your well-being and your health by adjusting your carbohydrate intake to within the amount that your metabolism can effectively handle. Carbohydrate load is more than just the total amount of carbohydrate in a meal or day. Carbohydrates that are quickly absorbed cause more strain on your metabolism and more tendency for ups and downs in blood sugar that the types of carbohydrate foods that are very slowly digested. Some people may find excellent improvement in their health from changing the types of carbohydrate foods they eat, without cutting down on the actual amount of carbs they are eating.  Some people can take steps to improve their insulin resistance and thus, if they are still making insulin, improve their ability to handle carbohydrates.

If you are not showing signs of difficulty handling high carb meals, you may do well on a lower fat, higher carbohydrate eating plan, provided that this focuses on low glycemic index foods (for example, with most carbs coming from foods with a glycemic index of 50 or lower). Some people do best focusing on a high volume of low-calorie-density foods.

7/9  Notice the things that interfere - In addition to the comments above, keep in mind that initiating changes in your life can bring out emotional reactions, sometimes in very unexpected ways. It can also bring out emotional responses in those around you. We all have blind spots when it comes to understanding ourselves. Friends, family and support groups can be invaluable. Sometimes getting professional help is needed.

8/9  You may need an extra intervention - Recognize that not everybody can get to the point where their appetite/satiety control system is working well enough that they can achieve reasonable weight control goals without sustained hunger or cravings. If it seems that you really are doing what you can and you feel you need some additional strategy, it is time to consider adding a “second level” intervention.

Nutritional ketosis is under-recognized as a useful option to lessen hunger during weight loss. Being in nutritional ketosis helps most people (not all) with appetite control.  This does not depend on whether or not you have any difficulties with handling carbohydrates or whether you would otherwise would be considering a low carb lifestyle. This is also called being on a “ketogenic diet”. Ketogenic diets are receiving quite a bit of research attention now as they can be remarkably effective for epilepsy and it may turn out that they are useful for a variety of medical conditions. Some people report that their energy and sense of well-being is improved when they maintain themselves in a state of nutritional ketosis (which is very different from ketoacidosis!).

Some people benefit from making use of a soft calorie target – for example, as a means to explore “habit eating” versus hunger, as a means to find what eating pattern gives them the most satiety, as a reminder to eat no more than they need, as an indication of how much to eat before stopping to see if a sense of satiety develops while waiting 20 minutes, or as a way to notice when inadequate sleep, stress, meal pattern disruption, etc. have acted to increase their appetite. (“soft” – that is, used for information feed-back, not rigidly enforced)

Although not of lasting benefit for most overweight people, there are some people who prefer a calorie-restricted diet and do well with it long term. If calories are not restricted much below need, a calorie-capped meal plan may serve as a quick way to break away from old habits, break restrict/rebound patterns of eating, end blood sugar swings, provide a focal point for lifestyle changes, and so on. This is listed under “second level” approaches because attempting to impose calorie restriction can completely block the process of finding benefit from a satiety-focused approach, and can cause more harm than good.  Still, some people find that, despite using all the strategies they can to promote satiety and avoid stimulation of excess appetite, they are not able to achieve their weight management goals without paying attention to calories. In this situation, it is vital to keep a very close eye out for any signs of the development of restrict/rebound eating patterns – such as cravings and episodes of excess eating.

There seems to be a role for medical programs that involve meal replacements. For some people, this might meet their needs in a particular way.

Some people find that a high exercise or activity output can play a central role for them in weight loss. The main role of exercise is for physical and emotional health. Research has shown that, for most people, a regular exercise program does not contribute substantially to weight loss. On the other hand, regular exercise does seem to be a tool to help prevent weight gain or regain. Still, some people are able to use a particularly high amount of exercise/activity as a major tool in their weight loss process.

A “third level” of possible interventions would be obesity management medications and obesity management surgery.

9/9  Every one is different - What will be best for you cannot be predicted solely by considering theories and looking at the research. Trial and error plays an essential role.  Recognize that each and every health intervention with each and every person is always a “trial of therapy”.  The outcome is never certain and must be evaluated, not taken for granted. With as much information as possible, evaluate your health responses over time. Keep adjusting your health practices and medical care according to your individual responses and needs, in context with your personal values and choices. Only you can decide what health habits and interventions you find to be worthwhile – that is, that give you enough benefit, balanced against “cost” and risk.

Related article, added Nov 22/12:

hunger” on www.hopefulandfree.wordpress.com  LINK

Weight control – a new framework takes shape

Stepping Stones

Stepping Stones (Photo credit: Rich Jacques)

Is it Time to Change the Default First Option?

If so, what would that be?

Satiety-Focused Weight Health is a conceptual framework that can be used to organize one’s approach to weight control, in the aftermath of the era of reliance on calorie restricted dieting.

I think that as of now we have the knowledge and interventions to make satiety-focused weight health preferable as the default first option to consider for the majority of those whose health is being affected by excess body fat and/or by fat within the abdomen (including, that is, people within the normal weight range who are “metabolically obese”).

First solve the hunger – then consider the weight.

The core conceptual shift – Calorie restriction can block weight control success.  For many people, the path to their weight control goals requires fully letting go of calorie restrictive diets and behaviors, at least for a period of time.

The line of thinking goes like this:

  • If you want to reduce the amount of food energy eaten (relative to energy requirements), there are only two options. You can try to work with or influence the functioning of the appetite/satiety system so that it signals for less food, or
  • you can try to impose your will power over your response to the appetite control system – that is, refrain from eating despite hunger – also known as calorie restriction.
  • Research has confirmed that calorie restricted dieting, although useful for some, is not a productive strategy over the long term for most people. Imposing control has not delivered on its theoretical promise.
  • This leaves us with the strategy of looking for ways to reduce the hunger drive and/or improve the satiety value that comes from the amount of calories consumed. This is now the available path. Since the only other path is to impose calorie restriction, a person’s best hope is to use all available and personally-acceptable means to achieve this – to the degree that this is practical and sustainable.
  • With a person’s best weight control asset recognized to be the best understanding and balanced functioning of their innate appetite/satiety control system, all things that interfere with that are counter-productive. A person can’t learn to understand and work with their appetite/satiety control system while at the same time acting in ways that disrupt or provoke that system – such as skipping or skimping meals, using caffeine or stress hormones to suppress appetite or refraining from eating when hungry.

“Solving” the hunger is not possible while the focus is on immediate weight loss.

Satiety-focused strategies have come from behind to emerge as a powerful set of tools. We now have enough knowledge base to make a satiety-focused approach to weight health a successful approach for many people. When it is not enough on its own, the next step is to consider moving on to level 2 and level 3 interventions, while still valuing the central importance of avoiding excess hunger and optimizing satiety.

The value of a satiety-focused approach has been under-recognized in large part because of the pervasiveness of calorie-restrictive dieting and behaviors, which have been adopted by large numbers of the population as ingrained chronic behaviours.  Therefore, it is not possible to evaluate the true usefulness of satiety-focused strategies for an individual unless there has been active, intentional, informed avoidance of calorie restriction in all it’s forms.

This entails a fundamental shift in thinking. Hunger and cravings when trying to eat less are seen, not as an unpleasant nuisance, but as fundamentally disruptive to the process of achieving weight control goals.

Your body intends to be in charge of how much you eat. You have an incredibly  complex, multi-layered and redundant fundamental body management and survival system referred to as the body weight control system, which is expressed through the appetite/satiety control system. We are barely scratching the surface in understanding this system and how it works. (You can find preliminary descriptions of this system and diagrams of our current concepts of how it works – but be advised that these are all early “sketches”, no matter what other impression you might be given.)

It turns out that your hunger drive can be pushed up by many things, some of which you can take control of and change. Your ability to feel adequately fed with the food you’ve eaten is also something that can be influenced by many things other than the energy (calorie) amount of the food itself.

Calorie-restricted dieting, with it’s inherent hunger, has been the default treatment recommendation for weight loss. We now know that this approach, although helpful for some people, in general has been stunningly ineffective. There is also reason to be concerned that it might, in some people, actually be harmful in that it can cause disrupted eating patterns, lowered metabolic rate, (unjustified) feelings of personal failure, distrust of medical/nutritional advice, and so on. (See link below to the previous post on this topic.)

You cannot win a fight with an ancient, extremely complex basic body system that is wrapped into every part of your functioning – it’s better to make nice.

Millions and millions of people had made repeated efforts to control their food intake by using their will-power to over-ride the signals from their body weight control system.  This often results in short-term wins that are tantalizingly misleading. Over the longer term, your body fights back. Research has shown repeatedly that the short term weight losses are a false promise, for most people. Although some people have made this approach work for them, for most people this approach brings poor results after the first weeks or months. The false promise of the weight loss in the first weeks or months has been wrongly interpreted as a valid indicator of how the weight loss could be expected to proceed over time. For most of the people most of the time, it is more realistic to see this initial weight loss phase as a temporary situation that the body will muster its resources to fight against.

Calories control the skirmishes, but satiety ultimately determines the winning or loosing of the game.

Satiety-Focused Weight Health – overview

“Satiety-focused Weight Health” is a conceptual framework on which to build an approach to:

  • supporting each individual’s efforts to attain and maintain a body composition and weight
  • that is most compatible with their long-term health,
  • in the context of their goals, their choices, their individual circumstances and their inherent body tendencies.

General health, individual circumstance, over-all quality of life and individual goals take precedence over total body fat when considering body composition targets.

If reduction in body fat stores is desirable and this is not occurring, interventions are chosen that are designed to facilitate achieving satisfactory satiety and freedom from sustained hunger while undergoing weight loss. Failure to see improvement in body fat levels over time is a valuable feedback from the body that more needs to be done to reduce appetite drive and facilitate satiety. Any attempt to impose a calorie cap will ruin this essential feedback and sabotage progress towards a successful long-term strategy (which will actually be composed of a combination of strategies).

The same model is applied when the goal is stabilisation of weight in the face of a trend to weight gain. This model can also be used when the target goal is “food peace” – that is, relief from chronic struggles with hunger and cravings.

In this model, sustained or excess hunger is regarded as a symptom requiring attention, investigation and problem-solving.  Sustained or excess hunger is also regarded as counter-productive, and something to be responded to by eating.  Therefore, when eating according to one’s appetite, the determination of whether hunger/appetite is excess is made principally by tracking changes in body composition as accurately as possible with today’s limited tools.

Of course, as part of general weight control recommendations coming from agencies and health practitioners, every effort is already being taken to help with hunger as much as possible during weight loss interventions. The shift is in the concept going from (1) the calorie cap being the prime and beneficial intervention, with hunger being addressed secondarily as much as possible within the calorie cap to (2) the achievement of satiety while body energy stores remain stable or intentionally decrease as the prime and beneficial target.

The key to unlock the great potential of this approach is the recognition that calorie restrictive dieting and behaviors can severely undermine or fully block success.

All those involved in the field of weight control have been increasing their focus on appetite and satiety.

The writing has been on the wall now for some time about the failures of the calorie restriction (go hungry) approach. More and more attention has been given to understanding the things that affect body weight control. There has been a lot of research into what things push people’s appetite up (for example, certain medications, sleep deprivation). Research also is aimed at understanding which foods or eating habits or patterns result in the most feelings of satiety for the least amount of calories consumed. For example, when people take in a lot of calories as sugary drinks, their bodies tend to not “notice” those calories fully in terms of how much else they consume afterwards. Obesity management medications and obesity management surgeries are also oriented to helping people feel less hunger (appetite) and more satiety from a given amount of food energy consumed (or consumed and absorbed in the digestive tract).

Experts in obesity management are moving away from the focus on calorie restricted dieting. However, this has not trickled down much yet from the realm of the “obesity experts” to the doctors, nutritionists, nurses and so on that most people see as part of their health care team. And you’ll still see endless books and magazine articles describing diets that are one form or another of calorie restriction (often cleverly disguised).

This major shift within the field of obesity medicine* is reflected in a ground-breaking program released in Canada in 2012. This program is called “The 5As of Obesity Management”. (Links below)  One core of the new approach that this program teaches is the focus on finding ways to reduce excess “drivers” of appetite and identifying and correcting factors that disbalance the appetite/satiety control system. The purpose of developing this program and a set of educational materials is to get this message out to the general community of health care providers and the public. The old days of “give diet sheet first, ask questions later” are gone, or should be.

This program is a remarkable development and I highly recommend that you have a look at the video at the bottom of this post and consider learning more. It is a bold statement that we really are in a new era and it is past time to ditch old ways.

To be continuedFirst, solve the hunger. (Part 3 of this series)

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* obesity medicine is also called “bariatric medicine” – note that’s not the surgeons, who practice bariatric surgery.

Related Resources:

The Canadian Obesity Network developed the tool kit “The 5As of Obesity Management”. This excellent set of resources is presented on their web site on their Resources page, on the tab “5As”   LINK

On the page, click on “View 5As Presentation (pdf)” for much more information than is presented in the video.

The set of resources is sold for a modest fee and is intended for use in clinical offices.

Video introduction to “The 5As of Obesity Management” (5 min.) Highly recommended.  This is a great video to share with your doctor and all members of your health care team.

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