Carpe Your Blood Sugar

What if the urgent public health issue of the day is less obesity itself and more about the elevated blood sugar (glucose) levels that occur in the majority of those with higher amounts of body fat?

What if the true cut-off level for concern is less than the target values now used for screening tests, diagnosis and for management targets in diabetes?

What if the urgency comes from the combination of two factors:

  • the fact that at last estimate about half (46%) of the adult population in the US (for example, but other countries are headed in the same direction) have pre-diabetes or diabetes, and
  • these elevated glucose levels are now optional for the majority of people, because a different approach to management can be used (at least, for those who have access to regular medical care and the personal resources to manage a care plan involving self-monitoring of blood glucose).

What if having similarly elevated blood glucose levels (including below the threshold for diagnosis of diabetes) means that people who are classed as ‘normal’ body weight face many of the most worrisome health issues that we have incorrectly been blaming on the total body fat itself?

What if swings in blood glucose are itself a major driver of weight gain and those swings can be eliminated?

Metabolic Syndrome is a term used for a cluster of related medical problems or health indicators that have at their core a reduced ability for the body to handle glucose.  The root causes for this have not yet been understood, so we can’t say that we have a way to treat or correct the source cause of the metabolic syndrome itself.  But we can succeed in keeping the blood glucose in the normal range, and thus largely interfere with the means by which the metabolic syndrome causes damage.

Among the experts in obesity, there is a sea change over the past few years moving towards the realization that the amount of extra fat itself is not the major driver of the degree of health impact of the obesity.  Yes, there are physical impacts of simply being a larger size, such as stress on the joints.  At very high levels of body fat, there can be other serious effects of the physical size, such as strain on the heart and fluid accumulation in the legs.  Certainly we must keep in mind and be very aware that there are emotional impacts, which are related to such factors as weight-based discrimination and (unfairly) feeling personally inadequate for not loosing weight when surrounded by the attitude that it should be so easy.  There are also economic impacts, including discrimination in the work place.

But there is an “illness” aspect that the obesity experts refer to.  Some people who are overweight or obese are actually quite healthy in their metabolism. It is thought that these are not the ones who are headed (at least, not any more than usual) for heart attack, stroke, cancer or the other “illness” consequences that we have come to consider to be caused by high body fat itself. Having a high amount of body fat is not a sole determiner for whether someone is more at risk of these outcomes than someone of “normal” body weight.

Metabolic syndrome is thought to be the major part of the difference, as well as some other factors, such as inflammatory molecules coming from body fat stores, most particularly those in the abdomen.  Control of blood glucose levels, it could be argued, is the most readily attainable change that can be implemented at this time.

Blood sugar levels respond very quickly, in a matter of days, weeks or, at most, months when a well-designed and individually adjusted program is instituted that focuses on reducing the intake of glucose-producing foods, adjusted to create an eating plan that the individual finds acceptable as a long-term aspect of their medical care.

My new web site and blog has been set up as a place to consider these ideas, the relevant research, the experiences of clinicians, the input of people affected by high blood glucose and the implications for individuals and for public health.

www.carpeyourbloodsugar.com

Still in infant form, please visit “Carpe your blood sugar”.

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