Sleep Link to Cravings

Just out is a study of sleep apnea in people with diabetes.  This is a small study, but worth noting.  LINK to report of study in Medical News Today.

They report:

“They found that in a small sample of clinic patients, the risk for sleep apnea was high among diabetics compared with non-diabetics, and that sleep apnea appeared to be associated with carbohydrate craving.”

The researcher comments:

“Previous studies have shown that sleep deprivation may lead to changes in hormones that regulate appetite and hunger,” Siddique said. “These hormonal changes can lead to significant craving for high-calorie carbohydrates such as cookies, candy, breads, rice and potatoes. The current study supports previous findings by validating this in a community sample of diabetics.”

Have a look at the article to get a better understanding of what was found and what it means.

Reference:

American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2012, June 15). “Link Between Sleep Apnea And Increased Risk For Carbohydrate Craving Among Diabetics.” Medical News Today. Retrieved from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/246563.php.
Addendum June 16th, in response to the comment below regarding observational studies:
The many limitations of observational studies are well known and always important to keep in mind.  They do provide a useful role in suggesting directions to look when trying to figure out actual cause and effect.  For many of the questions we need answers for, studies that could validly test for cause and effect are hard to come by or even in practice not going to be done, due to issues of study size, study costs, or simply what would have to be done to the human subjects in the process of testing for cause and effect.
In the case of this study, you get some insight into the motivation to conduct the research when you look towards the end of the article:
“The management of patients with diabetes and or metabolic syndrome based solely on pharmacotherapy, exercise and nutritional modifications without taking into account the risk of sleep apnea may not lead to optimal outcomes for patients suffering from these chronic diseases.”
It seems they are looking to build a case for more attention to the problem of sleep apnea in the era of managed care and protocol-driven medicine. Notice they do not claim any proof of causation and they are not trying to use the study results found in order to justify an intervention of any sort (medication, lifestyle or otherwise), just to justify more awareness of the need to explore for possible sleep apnea in people with diabetes.  Obviously, the well-known “big neck” rule is not succeeding in getting the job done, leaving people suffering from sleep apnea undiagnosed.
Here is a post which links to a discussion between 2 couples regarding their experiences with low-carb, real foods living. Part of the conversation is about sleep apnea.  LINK

2 thoughts on “Sleep Link to Cravings

  1. “the risk for sleep apnea was high among diabetics compared with non-diabetics, and that sleep apnea appeared to be associated with carbohydrate craving.”

    Gotta watch those correlations! Here’s the scoop: You can spot the OSA sufferer from across a room with a very high degree of accuracy. S/he has a neck size over 17 inches. That’s a stronger correlation than any other I know about. It’s nearly 1:1 (there are a few OSA sufferers who aren’t fat, but it’s a pretty low percentage, and those cases are usually due to some physical defect such as a deviated septum, or a lack of muscle tone).

    I’ve read so many “studies” that I’ve learned to stop reading any time I see “risk factor” or “correlation” because not only do most “researchers” consistently confuse correlation with causation, but they typically get the correlations wrong.

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