Finding and keeping the changes that work for you.

English: Boardwalk to Keeping Marsh birdwatchi...

English: Boardwalk to Keeping Marsh birdwatching hide, Beaulieu River Beyond this gate the boardwalk leads to Keeping Marsh birdwatching hide – as the sign on the gate says. The boardwalk and hide here are fairly recent (within the past year). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The insightful Meghann Douglas has once again posted a gem on her wonderful blog Meghanns Meltdown.

A short excerpt:

“That is indeed the path I’m following.  I see my cane in the storage closet several times a week: I ain’t going back to it again.  Figuring it out for myself.  I won’t follow any diet with a name or a marketing budget.  Learning about nutrition all over again.  Which brings up another  tangent……  I’ve been kicking myself for not figuring this out before, considering all the fancy certiffikats I can legally hang on the wall.  It didn’t occur to me to question.  I accepted on faith that the mainstream health information would be grounded in scientific fact and not politics.  Now I know better.  Wisdom.  It comes from experience, which is a fancy word for doing it wrong in the first place!  LOL”

For the full post: http://meghannsmeltdown.squarespace.com/blog/2013/2/9/the-hard-way-every-time.html

About finding for yourself the changes that work for you and then keeping at it. Requires motivation – yeah, but then discipline is what gets you the goal outcome.

I really enjoy visiting her blog on a regular basis. There is a lot to be learned there.

Insight into Childhood Obesity and Food Cravings

This presentation gives some real on-the-ground insight into what kids who are struggling with their weight actually feel about their food and their eating.

No proposed intervention should fail to take into consideration the problems reported by these kids.

Much thanks to the kids who shared their information and first-hand experience.

Asking kids what they need — who would have thunk it.

This presentation was by pediatrician and obesity expert Dr. Robert A. Pretlow, from his blog Childhood Obesity News

It was presented at the 2011 International Conference on Childhood Obesity in Lisbon, Portugal.

Addiction to Highly Pleasurable Food as a Cause of the Childhood Obesity Epidemic

Sounds like the biggest resource these kids need is help with cravings and knowledge of how to put in place abstinence from their food triggers. Sounds like, for many of the kids he included in his survey, their lives could be changed by knowledge that abstinence from their food triggers can be done in a safe, viable, enjoyable and fulfilling way.

Let’s just say it about hunger – 1

Re-blogged from Hopeful and Free. Saying it like it really is about her experiences with hunger. She has more to say on this topic in other posts and in the comments section. I’m an instant fan.

Of course, I just had to post a comment to her, and her reply also deserves attention:

Note: the rest of this post is just not appearing in proper formatted form. I have tried repeatedly to fix this and no go. Unfortunately, I have to break up this post.  Please see the next post for the continuation of this topic. Thanks for your patience.

Telling People They Don’t Exist – still

Motivational Poster - Support

Motivational Poster – Support (Photo credit: Raymond Brettschneider)

Inconvenient people challenge our mind-set and push our comfort zone.

This is not about shaming. It is about something subtly different – which is discounting other people’s experiences when they don’t match your own – even to the point of shunning.

Re-posted – Originally posted May 20, 2012.

One of my pet peeves is when people are, in effect, told that they don’t exist.

An example?  I get a migraine and flu-like symptoms if I eat even a tiny amount of gluten.  I don’t have celiac disease, I have gluten sensitivity. This has a major impact on the day-to-day living of my life and is something I can never afford to forget, ignore or down-play any time I am around food. Yet, to the vast majority of my own medical colleagues I don’t exist. They recognize the existence of a person occupying the space my body is in. However, what they see there is a person who isn’t me as I know myself to be. They see some deluded or self-deluded not very competent person who holds a questionable and likely false belief that places them in the ranks of the crackpots who think they are harmed by wheat, in the absence of laboratory proof. The recent recognition of gluten sensitivity as a medical condition (see this post) has not received wide-spread attention and is likely to be slow to be incorporated into routine medical practice.

People who have gained substantial health benefits from following a low-carb lifestyle are often treated in the same way. Many people report how frustrated they have felt when their doctors, their friends or work colleagues, or family members have discounted their stories and/or, even worse, discounted them as individuals for the decisions they have made and the “obviously false” conclusions they have come to.

But consider, does it ever happen the other way?

A few months ago I had an experience that has stayed in the back of my mind since.  On one of the blogs about low carb nutrition, I was reading an older post and the looong list of 50 or more comments under it. There was a lot of back-and-forth commenting among the contributors and with the author.  There was a good spirit of comradery evident. Everybody who raised a question, interesting idea or dilemma was responded to  — that is, everyone except one soul. One person posted a comment asking for insight or helpful comment on her situation – asking, that is, for help.  This soul was ignored as if she had leprosy. Her comment fell into a black pit.  The others resumed their conversations as if she didn’t exist.

Her social crime for which she received shunning – she dared to report that she was having little progress with weight loss despite a persistent and apparently well-applied very low carb/ketogenic diet. The post was old and the comments section had been closed, so I couldn’t respond to her myself.  I don’t think there was any attempt here to shame – just that her existence was inconvenient.

It is easy to love the idea that going low-carb is a sure-fire ticket to weight loss heaven.  This idea makes people smile and feel confident and enthusiastic.

The up-side  — the enthusiasm helps the knowledge spread.

The down-side  — since there is and never will be a sure-fire ticket to weight loss heaven, some individuals can feel unrecognized and discounted. Also, people who are broadly knowledgable about weight control issues recognize this as a false concept and this contributes to lack of respect for the message that low-carb nutrition is a valuable medical intervention (thus limiting the spread of the knowledge).

Low-carb nutrition and nutritional ketosis are very powerful and broadly beneficial tools that can help with weight loss in many ways. There are people who need other tools in addition or instead. Also, the benefits of low-carb nutrition can be swamped or over-ridden by other factors  – for example, certain medications or high stress states.

Many people do spectacularly well when adopting low-carb nutrition as a means to weight loss. Many others do very well or at least do well.  Messaging that focuses on dramatic weight loss, though, can mean that people miss the knowledge of how low-carb nutrition may benefit their health even in the absence of substantial weight loss.  It can mean that people get discouraged and miss out on the many other potential benefits.

“The reasonable man adapts himself to the world.  The unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.  Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”  – George Bernard Shaw

If you have benefited from low-carb nutrition, or someone you love has, you might owe a debt to someone somewhere in the past who was not able to achieve success with weight loss with the use of the knowledge and advice they then had access to. The knowledge and understanding of low-carb nutrition is only available to us today because of the determined efforts of one individual after another, acting in response to this lack of success.

If you have a story of fabulous, easy success to tell  – please share it, share it!  Be proud, strut, jump up and down.

I would like to encourage the practice of avoiding suggesting that because it was easy  – or even just that it was possible – for you, that this means it would be or should be the same for all others.

That “unreasonable person” whose response isn’t the same as others’ is a person we can all learn from.  Their situation may be just about to spur some new understanding that will benefit us all some day.

Addendum:  I realize that I might have left that sounding as if there was only one incident that concerned me. Unfortunately, I have more than once read posted comments that flat out stated that since that person had achieved a great outcome with controlled carb intake, that this meant all was solved for everyone else if they would only just get with the program – again meaning that anyone still visibly overweight could be judged on the spot as someone who just wasn’t trying hard enough. I guess being addicted to feeling superior is something that doesn’t show at the waist band.

Addendum Oct 30/12 – Part of what was on my mind leading up to this post was Jimmy Moore’s blog post April 30th about the criticism he received. Now, that is a bit different situation, because it involved much more than discounting. But, it is a perfect illustration of the point I make toward the bottom of this post about all progress being due to the “unreasonable man” and that the people who have the most difficult time are the people who can show us another part of the path forward. This turned out to be oh-so-true in Jimmy Moore’s case – as we have watched unfold over the past 6 months. This post (May 20th) was several weeks before Jimmy’s famous first post about his nutritional ketosis experience – which was posted June 14th. So, at the time this was originally posted, Jimmy had not announced his new successful strategy  – so it seemed that he was still in a situation where his body was “unreasonably” not responding to the best strategies he knew of at the time – strategies that worked fabulously for many other people.

Are you dealing with a saboteur?

I’ve just come across a great new blog, Keep Weight Off for Life!

This is written, articulately and with passion, by Linda Armistead RN

Check out her story.

One of her posts is What to do About Weight Loss Saboteurs?

Conference on Obesity and Mental Health

I have just posted a new page with information and resources related to the conference I attended last week.  LINK

The conference Obesity and Mental Health was held in Toronto June 26 – 28 2012.

The Toronto Star has a good summary article. LINK

The Precious – Sleep Denial and What We Throw Under the Bus

This photo shows an owl perched at a tree bran...

This photo shows an owl perched at a tree branch at night. According to Brit, this is Barred Owl (Strix varia). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The rock we are battered against.

The public health hill hardest to take.

The “precious”, gripped ever tighter in our hands no matter the consequences.

We wants it, the “precious”.*

OK, what on earth could I be referring to?.  Well, pick your metaphor or I’m sure you could come up with a few of your own.  What I am referring to is:

Denial of the need for adequate sleep.

Denial of the need for circadian rhythm health.

We don’t like being accountable. I sure don’t. It’s so boring and frustrating.  Aren’t we born to be free?  As a society, we’ve had to learn the hard lessons about money.  Now we are having to learn the hard lessons about food choices and weight health (and no, I don’t mean the simple calories-in-calories-out stuff).  Barely visible yet on the public radar are the hard lessons we will face about chronic under-sleeping and chronic circadian rhythm disruption.

When it comes to weight health, think of all the blogs and comments and tweets out there. I have seen countless posts and comments from people willing to turn their whole eating pattern on its head. (I have.) Willing to learn and chase the smallest details. (I have.)  Willing to spend hour upon hour tracking various people’s opinions and the latest commentary, insights and research. (I do.) Many put time and effort into being more active or engaging in a deliberate exercise program.  People talk about which medications might interfere with weight health.  Some pursue unusual techniques that are like grasping at straws. There are countless ways people take measures aimed at improving their ability to have and hold their chosen target weight.  Many times a lot of time, effort and loss of personal freedom is involved.

In all this, how often is a goal of adequate sleep and normalised circadian patterns targeted or achieved?

How much of all the other stuff we are doing is only necessary because of the chronic sleep/circadian issues?

In other words, what are we throwing under the bus in our attachment (sometimes fierce attachment) to keeping short sleeping hours and eating/sleeping/waking in disordered, non-rhythmic patterns?  One type of cost is the health impact from the sleep/circadian issues themselves.  This is a huge field of study and I won’t try to review it here.  A number of studies have linked sleep deprivation and circadian disruption with a tendency to gain weight.  (You can see some of this under the category “Sleep Heals” in the sidebar.)

The second type of cost is what we do to try to cope with the effects of the sleep disruption – instead of sleeping!  Just as an example, what if most of your tendency to gain weight would resolve if you just got well into a program of regular adequate sleep and a regular circadian patterns of sleep and meal timing?  How much less burden might there be from all the total things you do now that are for the purpose of helping you control your weight?  For example, research suggests that you would likely have some improvement in your ability to handle carbohydrates.  Research also suggests you would likely have less of a desire for sweets or reward foods.

If you have been chronically low on sleep, the benefits of getting regular adequate sleep are not going to be clear in the first weeks. In fact, there is a confusing phenomenon whereby people who have really been driving themselves and then get a night or two of unlimited sleep can suddenly feel much worse as the adrenalin levels fall and the body pushes you towards going into a “repair and recovery” mode of increased sleep for a while. This is very often mis-interpreted. People take this phenomenon, which is really an expression of the body’s desperation for sleep, as an excuse justifying their high-adrenalin habits.

The heart of the matter is time. We want more time. I don’t know of any other topic in weight control that can make so many people respond as if they are personally under threat.  In terms of emotional response, this topic is even worse than that terrible and much dreaded horrific topic – breakfast.

Of course, the topic of breakfast and skimped/skipped meals ultimately also involves time and time pressures for many people. (See the page “Restrict/Rebound” under Key Keys above.)

So, what are you “throwing under the bus” instead of turning the computer off and getting to bed?  I’ll be asking myself the same question more often.

*Lord of The Rings

2 Child-Size Concepts About Treats

Two Simple Guiding Concepts to Consider

When my son was heading into adolescence, and so starting to have more food out of the home and more opportunities to buy food (and food-like substances), I realised there could be real health trouble ahead.  I suggested to him a couple of concepts to use for guidance.  It was a very brief conversation, and was only referred to again a couple of times over the years, but I know he found these concepts useful as he has incorporated them matter-of-factly into how he lives now as an adult.

Two child-size concepts about treats:

  • treat foods are fine to enjoy occasionally, but not when you are hungry.  If you are hungry, eat real food.
  • treat drinks, such as pop (soda), are alright to enjoy occasionally, but not when you are thirsty.  If you are thirsty, drink water.

For example, you deal with your hunger by eating dinner.  If dessert is served, this is eaten and enjoyed after people have had as much dinner as they want to serve themselves.

Of course, the key to this is also providing a general experience for the child that communicates what is meant by “occasionally”.  For example, my son was never exposed to the concept that pop is something you simply buy as part of your normal groceries.  It is for special events or special outings, never a routine part of daily life.  Also, something is not special if it happens every week.

I think the word “enjoy” also is key to how this worked out for him.  If it is a special occasion or special outing and you are having a treat, that is something fun – it is to be enjoyed, and then you go back to your normal life.

There was no policing or stringent application.

There is far more to healthy eating than is covered by this, but I think these two concepts are something that even small children can understand and might be useful.

Short Link for this post http://wp.me/p2jTRh-9Q

Telling People They Don’t Exist

One of my pet peeves is when people are, in effect, told that they don’t exist.

An example?  I get a migraine and flu-like symptoms if I eat even a tiny amount of gluten.  I don’t have celiac disease, I have gluten sensitivity. This has a major impact on the day-to-day living of my life and is something I can never afford to forget, ignore or down-play any time I am around food. Yet, to the vast majority of my own medical colleagues I don’t exist. They recognize the existence of a person occupying the space my body is in. However, what they see there is a person who isn’t me as I know myself to be. They see some deluded or self-deluded not very competent person who holds a questionable and likely false belief that places them in the ranks of the crackpots who think they are harmed by wheat, in the absence of laboratory proof. The recent recognition of gluten sensitivity as a medical condition (see this post) has not received wide-spread attention and is likely to be slow to be incorporated into routine medical practice.

People who have gained substantial health benefits from following a low-carb lifestyle are often treated in the same way. Many people report how frustrated they have felt when their doctors, their friends or work colleagues, or family members have discounted their stories and/or, even worse, discounted them as individuals for the decisions they have made and the “obviously false” conclusions they have come to.

But consider, does it ever happen the other way?

A few months ago I had an experience that has stayed in the back of my mind since.  On one of the blogs about low carb nutrition, I was reading an older post and the looong list of 50 or more comments under it. There was a lot of back-and-forth commenting among the contributors and with the author.  There was a good spirit of comradery evident. Everybody who raised a question, interesting idea or dilemma was responded to  — that is, everyone except one soul. One person posted a comment asking for insight or helpful comment on her situation – asking, that is, for help.  This soul was ignored as if she had leprosy. Her comment fell into a black pit.  The others resumed their conversations as if she didn’t exist.

Her social crime for which she received shunning – she dared to report that she was having little progress with weight loss despite a persistent and apparently well-applied very low carb/ketogenic diet. The post was old and the comments section had been closed, so I couldn’t respond to her myself.

It is easy to love the idea that going low-carb is a sure-fire ticket to weight loss heaven.  This idea makes people smile and feel confident and enthusiastic.

The up-side  — the enthusiasm helps the knowledge spread.

The down-side  — since there is and never will be a sure-fire ticket to weight loss heaven, some individuals can feel unrecognized and discounted. Also, people who are broadly knowledgable about weight control issues recognize this as a false concept and this contributes to lack of respect for the message that low-carb nutrition is a valuable medical intervention (thus limiting the spread of the knowledge).

Low-carb nutrition and nutritional ketosis are very powerful and broadly beneficial tools that can help with weight loss in many ways. There are people who need other tools in addition or instead. Also, the benefits of low-carb nutrition can be swamped or over-ridden by other factors  – for example, certain medications or high stress states.

Many people do spectacularly well when adopting low-carb nutrition as a means to weight loss. Many others do very well or at least do well.  Messaging that focuses on dramatic weight loss, though, can mean that people miss the knowledge of how low-carb nutrition may benefit their health even in the absence of substantial weight loss.  It can mean that people get discouraged and miss out on the many other potential benefits.

“The reasonable man adapts himself to the world.  The unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.  Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”  – George Bernard Shaw

If you have benefited from low-carb nutrition, or someone you love has, you might owe a debt to someone somewhere in the past who was not able to achieve success with weight loss with the use of the knowledge and advice they then had access to. The knowledge and understanding of low-carb nutrition is only available to us today because of the determined efforts of one individual after another, acting in response to this lack of success.

If you have a story of fabulous, easy success to tell  – please share it, share it!  Be proud, strut, jump up and down.

I would like to encourage the practice of avoiding suggesting that because it was easy  – or even just that it was possible – for you, that this means it would be or should be the same for all others.

That “unreasonable person” whose response isn’t the same as others’ is a person we can all learn from.  Their situation may be just about to spur some new understanding that will benefit us all some day.

Addendum:  I realize that I might have left that sounding as if there was only one incident that concerned me. Unfortunately, I have more than once read posted comments that flat out stated that since that person had achieved a great outcome with controlled carb intake, that this meant all was solved for everyone else if they would only just get with the program – again meaning that anyone still visibly overweight could be judged on the spot as someone who just wasn’t trying hard enough. I guess being addicted to feeling superior is something that doesn’t show at the waist band.